Fully Loaded Brownie Cookies

Made with simple, whole-foods ingredients, these cookies will help you burn fat instead of sugar for energy. 

  • Makes 4 cookies.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup coconut oil

  • 1 large egg

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

  • 10 drops stevia glycerite 

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 1 cup cacao powder 

  • ½ cup dark chocolate chips

  • ½ cup pecan halves

  • *To be added in last: 1/3 cup unsweetened, unsalted sunflower seed butter (or peanut butter) 

Instructions:

In a bowl, combine the wet ingredients until smooth. Mix-in the dry ingredients. Add the sunflower seed butter at the end, loosely mixing it into the batter. Divide batter into 4 balls and place them on a lined baking sheet. Bake at 350 F for 13 minutes. 

Note: The cookies will crumble easily. You can eat them with a fork or pop them in the freezer for a couple minutes to firm them up.

 

Most of us know a little bit about insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, but few are aware of the important role it has to play when it comes to weight gain. 

 

Weight gain and obesity are essentially a hormonal imbalance caused by too much insulin. The key to successful weight loss is restoring insulin levels. 

 

Did you know insulin is hard at work in your body every time you eat?

 

It starts with carbohydrates

Next time you sit down at the dinner table, carbohydrates from your meal will be broken down by your body into smaller units of glucose (sugar). It doesn’t matter if you eat pasta, grains, starchy tubers, candy, cereal, or fruit: these carb-dense foods are ALL broken down into tiny molecules of glucose. These sugar molecules will make their way into your blood and insulin will get called to the scene to deal with the new energy delivery. 

 

Insulin’s job

There can only be 4g of sugar in the blood at any given time, so insulin’s job is to store away the sugar from your meal in its proper places. Insulin is like a store owner who has just received new stock and wants to put everything away in its rightful spot before customers show up.   

Where does insulin put away the glucose molecules? 

Insulin begins by checking if our cells need energy. Our cells have special insulin receptors on them. The insulin latches on to these receptors and it opens up a little door that allows the cell to gobble up some glucose. Thanks to this glucose, our cells have the energy they need to do things like move and heat the body, maintain blood pressure, pump blood through the heart, replace hair and nails, and help us think clearly. This is known as the basal metabolic rate (BMR). It’s the energy our body uses to carry out all of its functions. 

 

What happens once all the cells have been ‘fed’? 

If there is some glucose left in the blood, insulin still has some ‘cleaning up’ to do. Remember, there can only be 4g (1tsp) of glucose in the blood at any given time. Like a dutiful store owner, insulin wants the glucose out of the aisles and onto the shelves (out of the blood and into storage!). The cells of the body have been topped up but don’t worry, insulin has two storage solutions for the leftover glucose. Insulin will store the sugar that remains as GLYCOGEN or FAT so it can be used later.

 

Glycogen: it’s like having an energy bar on hand in your purse

The first storage spot for excess glucose will be as glycogen in the liver and muscles. Next time you need energy, you can tap into this special *reservoir* easily. Glycogen is like putting an energy bar into your purse. You can put it in and take it out with ease. Once you reach for it and bite into it, it delivers a burst of energy to your body. However, the space in your purse is limited. You can only put in so many energy bars before the purse fills up. The same thing happens with glycogen stores. They get full quickly. 

 

What happens when the space for glycogen runs out?

When glycogen stores become full, insulin tells the liver to turn the extra glucose into fat (lipogenesis). The liver begins making fat from the glucose molecules and then sends it off to be stored in our body in the form of ‘body fat’. This ‘fat’ makes its way under the skin, around other organs, or in the liver. The formation of this new fat is why we pack on the pounds when we overeat carbs. There is unlimited space for fat to be stored, but it’s harder for the body to convert it back into glucose (energy) once it is needed again. 

 

If Insulin Could Talk…

In the same way a store owner wants to keep his shelves stocked, insulin wants to keep our fat in storage. If insulin could talk it would say: 

 

“Hey body! There is plenty of energy available. We don’t need all this extra glucose, so turn it into fat and keep it in storage until I’m gone”. 

 

As long as insulin is hanging around, its message to STORE FAT dominates and we keep gaining weight.

 

To start burning fat, we need to lower insulin so the body can tap into fat stores for energy. We also need to diminish glycogen stores so the body has no other choice than to use the stored fat for energy.

 

How can I balance my insulin levels to help with weight loss?

To balance insulin levels, it’s important to focus on 2 things: WHAT you eat and WHEN you eat. 

WHEN (Meal timing)

Insulin is released in response to food. When you’re not eating, your insulin levels drop (at night, between meals, while fasting…).  If you eat 6x a day, and keep munching late into the night, you are constantly stimulating insulin. If insulin is constantly powered up, so is your fat-STORAGE machinery. 

 

WHAT (Consider your body’s hormonal response to foods)

Some foods stimulate blood sugar more than others, and blood sugar prompts insulin release. Think of it this way, the higher your blood sugar, the more ‘energy’ there is for insulin to ‘put away’, so more insulin is required. Refined grains and sugars raise insulin quickly, while dietary fat has the least impact on insulin. Whole-foods will have lower effects on insulin overall.

 

Bottom line: Eat a whole-foods based diet and limit foods like grains and sugar. You might also want to try eating your meals within a particular window of time each day or implementing intermittent fasting so insulin doesn’t always come racing to the scene.  

 

The takeaway

In order to achieve lasting weight loss, the idea is not to balance calories as we were led to believe for so many years, but to balance our hormone insulin. 

 

When you work with a practitioner who helps you implement strategies that lower insulin, you won’t have to restrict your calories and you will experience weight loss that lasts. When you lower your insulin, the body can switch from burning calories from food to tapping into those hard-to-reach fat stores with ease. 

 

Need help with weight loss?

Ditching refined carbs and grains will lower insulin levels and this will help with weight loss. However, saying good-bye to our daily indulgences of candy, cookies, cake, chips, sodas, or even things like bread and fruits can be hard to do! To address this issue, I have designed a week-long interactive online program that will fully equip you to make empowering food choices from here on out. You’ll never have to succumb to the sneaky claws of sugar again. 

August 17, 2019 will be the launch of my 7-Day Sugar Detox Program during which we will learn how to outsmart our sugar and carb cravings. Imagine being able to BREAK FREE from the hold sugar has on you AND being in total control of your food choices! This program will get you there. 

Although it is only one week long, the tips and techniques you will learn will last you a LIFETIME! If you’d like to join the 7-day detox crew, you can reserve your spot right here.

 

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Answer:  Avoid foods you are intolerant of.

 

Here’s why:

A huge proportion of your immune system is in your gut. If you consume foods you are intolerant of, it causes your immune system to react and attack. This immune response leads to inflammation in your digestive tract.
This inflammation is bad news because it can spread to your ENTIRE body. To help you understand how far-reaching gut inflammation can be, consider this: the inflammation from your gut can affect your brain and cause symptoms like anxiety, brain fog, and even depression.

 

Inflammation in your gut can also be the culprit behind these common symptoms:

  • Poor sleep
  • Skin conditions
  • Female hormone imbalances that lead to PMS, fatigue, irritability, bloating, irregular cycle, hot flashes, and low libido.
  • Male hormone imbalances that lead to fatigue, low libido, erectile dysfunction, muscle loss, and poor memory

 

Avoiding foods you are intolerant of can stop this cycle of immune reaction, inflammation, and unpleasant symptoms.

 

 

“Even if you don’t have digestive symptoms after consuming a food, you could still be intolerant to it.”

 

How do you know WHICH foods you are intolerant of?

The tricky part is that some foods produce a not-so-obvious inflammatory response. This makes it hard to associate a particular food with a symptom you may be experiencing.

 

Even if you don’t have digestive symptoms after consuming a food, you could still be intolerant to it.

 

A food intolerance can also trigger non-digestive symptoms (see image below) which can make it hard to pinpoint. What adds to the confusion is that symptoms may occur several hours or even days AFTER consuming the offending food.

 

Avoiding foods you are intolerant of can improve your quality of life

For years I had constantly plugged ears and muffled hearing. Before undertaking my studies in Natural Nutrition, I never thought there could be a connection between what I ate and the state of my hearing. When I eliminated milk products from my diet, my hearing returned to normal!

 

Challenging common inflammatory foods

The great news is, you don’t need a test to sort out food intolerances!
All you have to do is eliminate common food allergens from your diet for a period, then reintroduce them one at a time and note any reaction. In the nutrition world, they call this an elimination diet.

 

This is exactly what led me to discover milk was a big no no for me. When I reintroduced it after a month, my immune system let me know loud and clear it wasn’t happy. The next day, I developed a sore throat and became very congested. It was obvious I needed to give milk the boot!

 

Each of us has a different set of food our body treats as inflammatory.
 
To determine the ideal diet for you, figure out which foods are inflammatory for your body and which ones are not by doing an elimination diet.

 

“Each of us has a different set of foods our body treats as inflammatory”

Here’s a list of common inflammatory foods to get you started.

 
It may come as a surprise to some that certain common inflammatory foods are also health-giving foods.
How do we reconcile that some foods can be inflammatory AND health-giving?

 

The answer lies in our immune system. Depending on one’s early life and environment (antibacterial soaps, antibiotics, no exposure to dirt), some immune systems have less “training” and are more quick to react than others.

 

Some proteins and compounds in healthy foods can trigger these “quick to react” immune systems. If a particular food triggers your immune system, no matter how “healthy” it is, it is not healthy for YOU.

 

If you’ve been having unexplained symptoms and you want to find the ROOT CAUSE, I encourage you to eliminate and then challenge common inflammatory foods. Your immune system might be at play.

 

I’ve uncovered my food intolerances, now what?


 

After some experimentation, if you discover you are intolerant to a food, don’t worry! It doesn’t mean you won’t be able to enjoy it ever again. As you work to lower the inflammation in your body, your immune system will calm down and your gut will heal. Overtime, you’ll find that you will tolerate more foods! You should always reintroduce offending foods every 4-6 months to see if your reaction has changed.

 

 

 

Fasting should be easy to do and feel good. If you feel hungry, irritable, light-headed, or experience cravings during your fast, maybe you don’t have the right technique.

 

Before we begin with tips to implement fasting into your life, we’ll look at the anatomy of our digestive tract and why intermittent fasting can be SO powerful when used as a tool to improve one’s wellness. If you’re just looking for the how-to part, you can scroll to the last section of this post.

 

Fasting has been a common practice among humans for 2.5 million years of our hunter gatherer existence. With the onset of modern agriculture 10 thousand years ago, food became widely available, so we ate more often. Today, most of us have continued this practice of eating regularly throughout the day. To understand why fasting can be so beneficial, it’s important to have a basic understanding of our gastrointestinal tract and how it handles the food we eat.

 

Anatomy of our digestive tract

First Stop: The Mouth

Our digestive tract comprises a long tube that extends from our mouth to our anus. Digestion begins from the moment that first bite of food touches our lips. As we chew our food, we release enzymes that begin the breakdown of carbohydrates.

 

Second Stop: The Stomach

The stomach is where digestion ramps up. The stomach moves vigorously (like a washing machine during the spin cycle) to break down food to prepare it for the small intestine. The stomach also releases acid to kill bacteria, fungus and parasites that may have gained access to our body via our food. When the stomach has done its thing, it gradually releases the food into the small intestine.

 

Third Stop: The Small Intestine

The small intestine is where the magic happens. It’s where 90% of our caloric absorption occurs and it comprises 56% of our intestinal tract (that’s more than half of our digestive tube, from mouth to anus!). Why is it called the “small intestine” if it’s such a prominent part of our digestive tract? It’s because its diameter is smaller than that of the large intestine!

 

The lining of the small intestine is only one-cell thick. It is very fragile and prone to damage and inflammation. There are few bacteria in the small intestine compared to the large intestine. However, there are many immune cells that protect us from infection and disease! In fact, the largest number of immune cells in our entire body is in our small intestine! Who knew the small intestine was the hub of our immune system?

 

Fourth Stop: The Colon (Large Intestine)

After making its way through the small intestine, the food moves to the colon, which comprises 20% of our intestinal tract. The colon is not as fragile as the small intestine. It contains lots of bacteria that breakdown hard-to-digest food (plant fibers like veggies and fruit) through a process known as fermentation.

 

Maybe you’re wondering why our small intestine is bigger than our large intestine? Believe it or not, it used to be the other way around! Thousands of years ago, our large intestine was bigger! Our ancestors ate mostly hard-to-digest leaves and grasses so they needed the large intestine to be bigger to digest all that plant matter properly. As they became better hunters, they ate more animals. Their intestines changed to accommodate this new diet.

 

A break from food can be SO powerful!

 

We’ve discussed how the lining of the small intestine is fragile and prone to damage and inflammation. Just like you can injure any part of your body, you can ALSO injure your gut lining. If you have a gut injury and keep shoving food down your pipe every day, three times a day, you’re never giving it the time it needs to heal. 

 

How Gut Injuries Develop

The Standard American diet contains foods that are damaging to the lining of the gut (think grains, sugar, vegetable oils, and processed foods). Remember how I said the lining of the small intestine is one-cell thick? When damage to our gut-lining occurs because we’re eating too many of the SAD inflammatory foods, it causes the spaces between these cells to grow bigger and bigger. Eventually, molecules that have no place in your bloodstream, such as incompletely digested allergenic proteins from foods, can find their way into the bloodstream and cause an immune response. The term for this phenomenon is “leaky gut”.

 

This immune response can take on many forms. Mood issues, increased mucus production, aches and pains, food cravings, reduced energy, fatigue, dizziness, changes in skin, itchy eyes or mouth, increased need to clear your throat, headaches, and trouble sleeping are all signs that your gut could use a break from food.  

 

Why Fasting Poses an Issue for Some People

 

The body breaks down the carbohydrates we consume into glucose for our cells to use as energy. Trying to intermittent fast for too long, without fine-tuning your diet first, can cause the glucose in your blood to drop below normal levels and leave you feeling all kinds of horrible. Your body goes into panic mode because your cells don’t have the energy they need to keep everything running properly. 

 

There are many factors that can cause your blood sugar to go off balance when you fast, but the one I see most often is diet. If you’ve been eating a high-carbohydrate diet for most of your life and supplying your body with food every 3-4 hours each day, your body is still primarily burning glucose as a fuel. Since glucose burns quickly, you run out of energy quickly and fasting becomes impossible.

 

Recurring blood sugar lows can affect your hormones and have a negative impact on how you feel so you want to avoid them as much as possible. Overtime, experiencing too many blood sugar lows can lead to issues such as weight gain, fatigue, insomnia, irritability, brain fog and even low libido. If you’ve tried fasting before and noticed you don’t feel good, stop. It may be because of a drop in your blood sugar.

 

When you fuel on carbs AND eat often, THAT’S what your body EXPECTS. If you take the carbs and the constant snacking away in a flash because you want to fast, your blood sugar will drop and your body will panic.

 

Before you begin to intermittent fast, PREPARE your body for what’s coming and then TRAIN it to fast slowly. How does one prepare their body for fasting? We want to make sure your blood sugar is stable from the start AND encourage your body to burn fat for energy. This begins with tweaking your diet, because what you eat determines if your body burns glucose or fat for energy.

 

How To Implement Intermittent Fasting Into Your Life

 

Most people begin by fasting right from the get-goー but if your diet isn’t in check, things could go wrong quickly! Before you jump in, look at what you’re eating on a day-to-day basis. To prepare your body for intermittent fasting, it’s best to fuel with natural, unprocessed, whole-foods 80% of the time.  

 

Another facet of your diet you might need to adjust is your carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates affect your blood sugar THE MOST out of the three macros (carbs, proteins, fats). Reducing your carbs and focusing on protein and healthy fats will help tone your metabolic machinery in favor of burning fat for fuel and make fasting a lot easier. You might even find you can go longer between meals and that you have less energy dips in the afternoon even BEFORE you consciously attempt a fast.

 

Once you feel comfortable with the adjustments you’ve made to your diet and have been implementing them for some time, you can practice intermittent fasting!

 

You should always start small and work your way up. Begin with a simple overnight fast: stop eating after dinner and delay breakfast by an hour the next morning. This means if you usually eat breakfast around 8:00 am, try to eat breakfast at 9:00 am instead. Push your breakfast by one additional hour over several weeks until you can fast comfortably from after dinner until 12 noon the next day. If you find you can’t push your fast past a certain time, that’s okay and you can stay there as long as you need. You could repeat this fast every day, or 1-2 times a week. Remember to do what feels good.

 

If you still find it difficult to fast after changing your diet, you can perform a liquid fast by sipping on a homemade broth, lemonade, or elemental shake throughout your fast. These will provide nutrients and support your blood sugar. Because your digestive system can breakdown these fasting solutions easily, you will still give your gut a break and the opportunity for repair.

 

Fasting is not for everyone. If you have a serious metabolic disease such as diabetes, it’s best to consult with your doctor before changing your diet or lifestyle.   

 

Resources:

 

Ruscio, Michael (2018). Healthy Gut Healthy You: The personalized Plan to Transform Your Health from the Inside Out. Las Vegas, NV: The Ruscio Institute

 

 

 

 

DUTCH-PROCESSED VS. NATURAL COCOA

Have you ever wondered why some cocoa powders are light-brown, and others are dark brown? Before I became interested in how food manufacturers process and alter our food, I assumed that darker cocoa was richer and contained more minerals and flavanols than its lighter coloured counterpart.

Turns out, I was wrong!

There are two types of cocoa powders available on store shelves – Dutch-processed cocoa powder (sometimes called alkalized cocoa or treated with alkali) and natural cocoa powder.

Natural cocoa powder is just what the name implies, natural. It is cocoa powder in its pure, unaltered form. It’s characterized by a light brown color, and it has a low pH that sits around 5, which makes it bitter. Natural cocoa powder is one of the richest sources of dietary flavanols, plant compounds that act as antioxidants and have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular health. If  you consume cocoa powder because of the health benefits, choose a natural cocoa powder.

 

Dutch-processed cocoa was invented almost 200 years ago by a Dutch chemist named Van Houten. He wanted to make cocoa less bitter so more people would like it. To this day, food manufacturers still use this process to make cocoa more appealing to customers and boost their profits. The Dutch process involves adding sodium carbonate to the cocoa powder to raise the pH, which makes the cocoa less bitter. It also alters the cocoa powder in other ways:

 

  • The color changes from a light brown to a dark brown.
  • The flavonols, those beneficial compounds I said acted as antioxidants, are destroyed in the process (bye-bye health benefits!).
  • The cocoa powder itself becomes soluble, making it easier to use in beverages or other applications.

 

The  degree to which food manufacturers alkalize cocoa affects the final product’s  flavanol content:

  • Lightly alkalized cocoa retains up to 40% of its flavonols.
  • Heavily alkalized cocoa retains 22% of its flavonols.

The problem is, there is no way of knowing if a cocoa powder was lightly or heavily alkalized because food manufacturers are not required to disclose it on the label.

If you prefer a smoother chocolate taste (less bitterness), then dutch-processed cocoa is what you’re looking for. You can get plenty of antioxidants from other whole-foods such as berries and broccoli sprouts

 

 

Sources

 

K Hollenberg N. Vascular action of cocoa flavanols in humans: the roots of the story. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol (2006) 47(Suppl 2):S99–102; discussion S119–21.10.1097/00005344-200606001-00002

 

Miller K.B., Hurst W.J., Payne M.J., Stuart D.A., Apgar J., Sweigart D.S., Ou B. Impact on alkalization on the antioxidant and flavanol content of commercial cocoa powders. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2008;56:8527–8533. doi: 10.1021/jf801670p.

 

 


A 2018 study published in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition shows that broccoli sprouts can help you poop more.

This placebo-controlled trial was done in order to determine the effect of sulforaphane, a compound found in broccoli sprouts, on the bowel movements of human subjects struggling with constipation. The study concluded that eating broccoli sprouts up-regulates the activity of antioxidant enzymes, leading to improved intestinal motility and defecation.

 

Method

48 subjects took part in the study. They were assigned to one of two groups. The first group was instructed to eat 20g raw broccoli sprouts per day, providing 4.4mg/g of sulforaphane.

The second group was instructed to eat 20g of raw alfalfa sprouts per day, which provided no sulforaphane. The experiment lasted 4 weeks. The sprouts were harvested by a local farm and delivered to the participants’ home twice weekly.

Before the study, participants filled out a questionnaire about their bowel patterns. The subjects didn’t know if they were in the broccoli sprout group or the alfalfa group. To prevent other factors from influencing bowel function, the subjects agreed to not eat cruciferous vegetables, fermented foods, probiotics, and antibiotics.

Results

Throughout the study period, the broccoli sprout group experienced improvements in bowel habits and these improvements continued for 4 weeks even after they stopped eating the broccoli sprouts. The alfalfa sprout group reported no change in bowel habits.

Did you know?

Major nutrients in broccoli sprouts include

  • protein
  • potassium
  • calcium
  • magnesium
  • phosphorus
  • B-carotene
  • retinol
  • vitamin K
  • folic acid

Why does sulforaphane help us poop more? What’s so special about it?

The answer lies in its ability to boost our antioxidant levels. Antioxidants help us poop more by turning off oxidative stress caused by too many free radicals. Free radicals are unstable and highly reactive molecules produced because of normal reactions occurring inside cells, and because of outside sources like pollution, cigarette smoke, radiation, and medication.

 

When we have too many free radicals in relation to antioxidants, it leads to a phenomenon called oxidative stress. When this phenomenon occurs, the body doesn’t have enough antioxidants to neutralize the free radicals, so it becomes overwhelmed. The unopposed free radicals steal electrons from other compounds like lipids, proteins, and DNA, turning them into free radicals themselves and triggering disease. Oxidative stress plays a role in the development of chronic and degenerative illness such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, aging, cataract, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

 

Oxidative stress can negatively affect our ability to poop. Sulforaphane, a compound found in broccoli sprouts, increases our antioxidant levels, counteracting oxidative stress.

 

 

Other Key Findings

  • Broccoli sprouts caused a decrease in bifidobacterium after the 4-week study period. Bifidobacterium returned to pre-intervention levels 4 weeks after stopping broccoli sprouts.
  • There was a minor decrease of T3 values in the broccoli sprout group. However, subjects didn’t show signs of hypothyroidism throughout the study period.
  • In another study published in 2013, Yanaka found that sulforaphane protects the small intestine from damage caused by NSAIDS. I recommend loading up on broccoli sprouts whenever you take a NSAID drug for pain to mitigate the damage it can cause to your gut.

I recommend loading up on broccoli sprouts whenever you take a NSAID drug to mitigate the damage it can cause to your gut.

Valérie Clément

Holistic Nutritionist

References:

Yanaka A. (2018). Daily intake of broccoli sprouts normalizes bowel habits in human healthy subjects. J. Clin. Biochem. Nutr. 62 75–82. 10.3164/jcbn.17-42

 

Yanaka A, Sato J, Ohmori S. Sulforaphane protects small intestinal mucosa from aspirin/NSAID-induced injury by enhancing host defense systems against oxidative stress and by inhibiting mucosal invasion of anaerobic enterobacteria. Curr Pharm Des. 2013;19:157–162.

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Vivamus id euismod massa. Suspendisse orci est, cursus quis efficitur quis, porttitor sit amet justo. Sed ac orci felis. Phasellus commodo arcu placerat purus vulputate fringilla. Vivamus rutrum eu tortor non ultrices. Proin posuere porta ligula, id fermentum nisl vestibulum id. Nunc id neque ac magna fringilla ultrices vel quis sem. Fusce a sem vel nunc sollicitudin consectetur. Suspendisse gravida tempor diam, eget imperdiet dui dictum a. Aliquam hendrerit aliquam vehicula. Integer feugiat arcu sapien, in facilisis lacus rutrum eu. Pellentesque eget fringilla odio, et vestibulum turpis. Proin sit amet venenatis nisi.

 

Vivamus id euismod massa. Suspendisse orci est, cursus quis efficitur quis, porttitor sit amet justo. Sed ac orci felis. Phasellus commodo arcu placerat purus vulputate fringilla. Vivamus rutrum eu tortor non ultrices. Proin posuere porta ligula, id fermentum nisl vestibulum id. Nunc id neque ac magna fringilla ultrices vel quis sem. Fusce a sem vel nunc sollicitudin consectetur. Suspendisse gravida tempor diam, eget imperdiet dui dictum a. Aliquam hendrerit aliquam vehicula. Integer feugiat arcu sapien, in facilisis lacus rutrum eu. Pellentesque eget fringilla odio, et vestibulum turpis. Proin sit amet venenatis nisi.

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